Introduction
  The House
  >> Live data
  >> Efficiency

  Monitoring
  >> (Web Energy Logger)
  >> (WEL Store)

  The Land
  Wildlife
  About Us

  Podcast Info
  Links (Resources)
  Books
Construction Pics
  Foundation
  Radiant Slab
  Acid Stain floors
  Ground Loop
  Wood Framing
  Mechanical
  Equipment Room
  Monitoring System
  Exterior
  Interior
Mission Statement
  Earth (Sheltering)
  Sun (Passive Solar)
  Water (Geothermal)    >> Efficiency test
Design Process
  Timeline
  Goals
  Room Guide
  Concepts
  Preliminary
  3D Model
  Final Design
  Download Plan
Energy Mgmt.
  GREEN HVAC
  Energy Logger
  The Weather
Phil's Other Stuff
  Marsupials
  GEARS
  SUGO
  Resume


Real-Time HVAC Monitoring system.
Data is updated once a minute. Also see 7 day trend data here.

     My related HVAC pages      

This is an experimental real-time monitoring page created to provide a public window into my Geothermal Heating and Cooling system.

The diagram above depicts my integrated HVAC system.  Thin colored lines are typically water pipes, thick gray lines are air ducts.
All the temperatures on the diagram above are measured using my 1-wire temperature network
This page is updated once a minute if my monitoring program is running.  Watch the "last update" time/date in the box at the top left of the diagram.
Since this system is designed to conserve energy, system components are only energized when they are needed.  Consequently many of the temperature values are only valid when a system is active and pumping air or water.  Each temperature in the diagram above is prefixed with a alpha-numeric designation.  These are defined below, along with their periods of validity. 

Designation Media Explanation Valid and Meaningfull
G1 Water The source water supply from the earth loop. When either Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) is running.
G2 Water The earth loop return from the Water-Water Heat Pump (WWHP). When either GSHP is running.
G3 Water The earth loop return from the Water-Air Heat Pump (WAHP). When either GSHP is running.
D1 Water Fresh drinking water from the artesian well. When hot or cold water is being used in the house.
D2 Water Water from the Storage tank going to be heated in the WWHP. When the WWHP is running.
D3 Water Water from the WWHP being returned to the Storage Tank. When the WWHP is running.
D4 Water Domestic Hot Water from the Storage Tank. When either DHW is being used in the house, OR, when one or more radiant slab zones is active.
D5 Water Return water from the Radiant Slab Heat Exchanger to the Storage Tank. When one or more radiant slab zones is active.
S1 Water Hot Water Supply from the Radiant Slab Heat Exchanger to the circulator pumps. When one or more radiant slab zones is active.
S2,S3,S4,S5 Water Hot water supply for each of the 4 Radiant Slab Zones. When the associated Zone circulator is active.
S9,S8,S7,S6 Water Cool water return from each of the 4 Radiant Slab Zones. When the associated Zone circulator is active.
A1 Air Fresh Air from outside the house being passed into the Energy Recovery Ventilator (ERV) All the time.
A2 Air Fresh air leaving the ERV after exchanging energy with the stale exhaust air. All the time.
A3 Air Conditioned air leaving the WAHP, being sent into the house.  When the WAHP is running to heat or cool the air.
A4 Air If the WAHP is not running, this is the same air as described in A2.  However, if the WAHP is being used to condition the house air, then it's the air from the house being returned to the WAHP to be conditioned.  See note at left.
A5 Air Stale air from the bathrooms and laundry being sent to the ERV for energy capture. All the time.
A6 Air Stale air being exhausted to the outside after exchanging energy with the incoming fresh air in the ERV. All the time.


© 2000-2015, Phil and Lisa's relaxed lifestyle home.
An exercise in Energy Smart, Not So Big living.
www.OurCoolHouse.com - Ideas@OurCoolHouse.com

Google
 
Web OurCoolHouse.com

This site is all about building a cool, energy efficient house, that makes maximum use of earth sheltered design, passive solar heating and cooling, geothermal exchange energy management, and right sizing of the house for it's designated use. The home's placement is on a south-facing hillside in Deep Creek Lake, Maryland. This site describes the design process, the technologies used and the expected results. We also have a comprehensive Links Page for anyone who is also interested in designing a similar project.